Deal Out 20

Written by Donna Boucher

Donna has been a teacher, math instructional coach, interventionist, and curriculum coordinator. A frequent speaker at state and national conferences, she shares her love for math with a worldwide audience through her website, Math Coach’s Corner. Donna is also the co-author of Guided Math Workshop.

I feel a little like David Letterman this week, but I’m opening the ‘viewer’ mailbag and responding to some questions and suggestions I’ve received.

First up, Beth wanted a version of Deal Out a 10 that would challenge her higher kiddos by using two playing cards and having the kids build to 20. Tah dah! I present you with Deal Out 20. Thanks, Beth, for that great idea!

Click here to grab yours. Tune in tomorrow night for more viewer mail.  🙂

17 Comments

  1. Primary Paradise

    Love both of these. Thank you so much.
    Tammy
    Primary Paradise

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      My pleasure, Tammy!

      Reply
  2. Sue Anderson

    Thank you! Great activity!

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      My readers have the best ideas, right?!

      Reply
  3. Beth Korda

    Thank you!!

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      You’re welcome, Beth. 🙂

      Reply
  4. Cindy in Wisconsin

    Many thanks! This is a great way to build skill with addition and have fun at the same time.

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      That’s the best, right Cindy? 🙂

      Reply
  5. laura

    thank you for sharing this. it will be great to put out for the early finishers to practice their facts and keep them sharp.
    laura

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      You’re welcome, Laura! Glad it will come in handy for you! 🙂

      Reply
  6. meesabelle

    Thank you! This looks like lots of fun!

    Reply
  7. Leigh Newton

    Love your idea. It has me thinking:
    For my 4/5 students they could make it a game for two or more players, to build to instant calculations.
    1. They could deal one or two cards, depending on their ability.
    2. (Add them up and) determine how many more they need to reach 20, using ten frames.
    3. Once they have some speed, they could work it out mentally and check the number needed on a ‘difference grid’ (just made up that name). e.g 2>18, 3>17, 4>16 etc.
    4. The difference (number needed to make 20) is their score. Start another round.
    5. Add up scores with a calculator after, for example, 5 minutes.

    Reply
  8. Tammy Sapp

    I LOVE your blog! This is such a great challenge for my higher groups!

    Reply
  9. Karin Oravec

    Love this activity!! Is there are way to edit the worksheet? I don’t necessarily want my students to add first and then subtract like you have in the directions?

    Reply
    • Donna Boucher

      I’m sorry, Karin, but because of the copyright restrictions on the graphics I use, I can’t provide editable versions of my files.

      Reply
  10. Lori

    Thank you. This can used used many times over.

    Reply
  11. Diane Herman

    Thank you…love that I am finding so many things here 🙂

    Reply

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